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Anal sex

Compared to other types of sex, anal sex has the highest risk of contracting HIV / STDs. For some, such contact is enjoyable, while for others it can be painful and traumatic. There is a risk of infection if such contact has not taken place at all – it has only been attempted.

Although anal sex is the most common cause of HIV infection compared to other forms of sex, anal sex can also be safe.

Always use condoms and lubricants during anal sex!

During anal sex, microtraumas always occur both on the penis and in the anal area. When the penis is inserted into the anus, the sphincter and mucous membranes of the anus are stretched, which almost always causes microtraumas. Microtrauma to the penis is most commonly caused by the attachment of the foreskin and ligament to the head of the penis.

The use of lubricants, gentle treatment of the partner, and dilation of the anal opening – reduction of the resistance of the sphincter of the anal opening – can reduce the occurrence of microtrauma injuries.

The possible problems can be divided into two categories:

  1. Injuries – Various injuries can occur when inserting the penis. Injuries can also occur during sexual intercourse if your partner’s movements are rapid or brutal. Anal trauma is usually accompanied by pain, discomfort and bleeding. With microtraumas, the bleeding will be negligible – virtually imperceptible. Regular trauma to the anus can cause inflammation of the veins, leading to the formation of hemorrhoids. Excessive trauma to the anus may result in rupture of the sphincter.
  2. Infection – without a condom, there is a high chance of becoming infected with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, even if your partner does not ejaculate (if your partner does not stop you). It is possible to become infected with all known STDs during anal sex, especially if a condom is not used and ejaculation occurs in the rectum.

In 50% of cases, STDs in the rectum go without complaints!

Anal trauma can be reduced by:

  • it is desirable to sit in a warm bath or bowl of water for 10-15 minutes before contact, as heat treatments relax muscle tension and make it easier for them to relax;
  • during sex use a lot of lubricant – lubricants that improve slipperiness;
  • promote the loosening of the anal opening sphincter prior to penile insertion. It would be advisable to lubricate the anal area with a lubricant, then slowly begin to relax the entrance to the anus with your fingers or special “toys”. Insert one finger first, then two fingers into the anus. And only when the insertion of the fingers is not difficult and the muscles are noticeably relaxed can the penis be inserted slowly;
  • during exercise of the penis, do not tense, but try to relax in the same way as during defecation;
  • the less traumatic, the greater the muscle relaxation is in the so-called “doggy” position – leaning on the elbows and knees and with your back towards your partner. This position will make it easier for your partner to gently inject your penis.

After contact, you should wash and lubricate the anal area with 2% Troxovazine gel – this will promote the healing of microtraumas and prevent inflammation.

To avoid becoming infected with HIV / STDs:

  • Anal sex is practiced only with one regular partner who does not use intravenous drugs. If your partner uses intravenous drugs – refuse such contact or use a condom!
  • Choose a less risky type of sex during casual sex – masturbation or oral sex;
  • In casual contacts – regardless of whether the partner is known or unfamiliar, it is mandatory to use a condom during anal sex;
  • Unlike the active partner (who is injecting), the passive partner (who is injecting) cannot take specific preventive measures after sexual intercourse to prevent HIV / STD infection. The passive partner is more at risk of infection.

If you enter the penis

There is a risk of minor microtraumas and the risk of contracting HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, and other diseases caused by the rectum.

During anal sex, even without a condom with a regular partner, there is a possibility that the intestinal microflora (intestinal rod, etc.) enters the urethra, which can cause non-specific inflammatory products in the urethra and prostate.

STDs (gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, etc.) in the rectum occur in 50% of cases without complaints, so your partner may not know that you are ill. Also in the first stage of syphilis, a syphilitic ulcer (chancre) may be in the rectum, which neither you nor your partner may know or feel. Therefore, there is a high risk of contracting any of these diseases.

As both partners almost always experience microtrauma during anal sex, you are also at risk of becoming infected with the HIV virus.

When you drive your penis inwards, it works like a piston trying to push everything forward. In the erect state, the opening of the urethra of the penis is more open and without the use of a condom, the contents of the rectum (mucus with microorganisms, feces) are “expelled” in the urethra. Because of this, there is a high risk of micro-organisms capable of causing inflammation entering the urethra.

Complaints may occur 2-7 days after contact for discomfort while urinating. There may be no complaints if the inflammation is chronic. In the case of a chronic prostate, the first complaints may appear after 5 to 7 years.

Initially, various types of sexual disorders may occur (premature ejaculation, decreased libido, etc.); there may be pulling, discomfort in the perineum; difficulty urinating (need to urinate at night), and other complaints.

After contact, the foreskin may swell, this is observed in cases where microtraumas occur in the foreskin, in which various microorganisms enter (intestinal rod, Gardnerella, etc.). Usually the day after contact, the foreskin becomes thick, red, and it is difficult to pull it over the head of the penis.

The most common injuries are a rupture of a ligament. Complaints usually appear immediately after sexual intercourse – an unpleasant burning and aching sensation under the head of the penis.

To avoid becoming infected with HIV / STDs:

  • Always use a condom during anal contact, whether with a well-known or completely unknown partner!
  • If you have one regular sexual partner who does not use intravenous drugs and you do not use a condom during sexual intercourse, you should:
  1. before contact, the partner should empty the rectum (perform an act of defect). For this purpose, special microclips are available in pharmacies, after which the abdomen is excreted within 5-10 minutes;
  2. it would be desirable for the partner to rinse the rectum with the help of an enema;
  3. make extensive use of lubricants. Thoroughly lubricate both the penis and the partner’s anus. Paying special attention to the head of the penis, including the opening of the urethra. It is desirable to use antibacterial lubricants. For anal sex, it would not be advisable to use a nonoxylone lubricant (as this may cause irritation of the intestinal mucosa.
  4. before inserting the penis, thoroughly massage the anus with your fingers to relax the muscles;
  5. at first, inject the penis very slowly and gently;
  6. after sexual intercourse it is definitely necessary to wash and it would be desirable to have a shower;
  7. after washing, lubricate the penis with an antifungal or anti-inflammatory ointment.
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